Home arrow Volume 11 Issue 1 Spring 2015 arrow Miller & Shellabarger : Men who Sew Performance
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miller and shellaabarge

Miller & Shellabarger explore the dynamics of love and loss through p that emphasize the artistic process as a metaphor far the cycles of life and death, of connection and separation.

LONG-TERM

 

Co-curated by Adriana Disman and Sandrine Schaefer
as part of LINK & PIN performance series
Co-presented with Fado
Saturday, April 12, 2014 – Sunday, April 13, 2013
HUB 14 14 Markham St.
Toronto Canada M6J 2 E9

rabit

 Saturday April 12, 2014, 1:45 pm. When I arrived at Hub 14 I was greeting by this lovely little knitted creature.


 

The work featured in LONG TERM investigates extended duration, collaborative practices of various artist duos. Unfolding over 2 days, the event addresses the complexities involved in creating, balancing, and evolving a shared creative process.

 

Miller & Shellabarger explore the dynamics of love and loss through p that emphasize the artistic process as a metaphor far the cycles of life and death, of connection and separation. The Chicago-based couple has been creating collaborative works for. 20 years. Miller & Shellaborger are the recipients of several grants and fellowships and their work is included in museum collections internationally. In oddillon to having a number of solo shows, their work has been written about in Artforum.com, Art & Auction, Frieze, Artnet, The Art Newspaper, Flosh Art, Art Pulse TimeOut Chicago, and the Chicago Sun Times. Outes Miller and Sian Shellaborger also maintain separate artistic practices. They live and work in Chicago

 note

 then I was greeted by this note so off to Trinity Bellwoods Park I went

 the beginning Miller and S

 
and there they were Miller and Shellabarge, in what appeared to be conversation. They where not knitting they were sewing themselves to each other

 long stitch
 
from 2pm until 6 pm they quietly sat side by side and sewed their clothing to each other.
 
 
 change hands

the need to sew with the right hand or the left hand was dictated by where the sewing was taking place and by what hand was available to do the sewing.
 
close up
 
 
the physical action in this performance was minimal the repeated motion of a whip stitch, the occasional threading of a needle ( think about it, the sleeve of one sewn to the shirtfront and pant leg of the other )
 
 over the shoulder
 
like watching Butoh dance it isn't necessarily what you are seeing it is what you might miss if you turn away.
 re sewing
 
 
the sewing was not continuous and the moment of them cutting themselves apart might easily be confused with the sewing together
 
 cutting apart
 
 
Like a play in three acts the performers when cut apart got up to stretch as did the very small audience.
 
 scares

the "scares" of the encounter visible after the encounter.
 
 starting again
the stitching begins again
 and again
 

and again
 
 
 and again
 
and again. the intimacy of the stitching was nothing compared to the cutting apart.
 
closer sewing
 
four cycles of stitching together and cutting apart came to and end at 6pm. Staying the course was well worth it. There is more to be said about witnessing/ experiencing this performance.
 
the end
 
THE END 
 
 
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